#whatiwore 2017w28 + Sunday links

Barcelona:

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This week’s garment-related brain food:

Label Lingo: Everything You Need to Know about Synthetic Fabricsfiber info keeps trickling in, here’s a bit on synthetics suggesting you look for recycled synthetics.

Where many of the clothes you throw away end up (Hat tip to my friend My Lan for this one!) – describes a large scale garment downcycling operation in Panipat, India. The most curious thing about this article is that the tone suggests an appalled reporter while in the big scale of things this isn’t even that bad. While labor intensive, the “shoddy” fabric made by these textile mills is still a reasonable use of “mutilated” (i.e. unsalable in any part of the world) garments compared with slowly rotting at a landfill + it allows mixing of fibers + the end product is a demanded one.

UN Comtrade Analytics – allows you follow commodity import/export routes, quantities and fluctuations. In this case the commodities of interest are “Textile fibers”. You get to play around and explore fun graphs like the following, telling you that cotton dominates the fiber market and that “textile fibers – worn clothing” travel from North to South (and also inside Europe, my guess that this is mostly Western – EU Eastern Europe second-hand shuffle):


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Are you getting bored with your summer stuff already? Have sundresses become the uniform? Do you dream of chilly weather that would permit layers, scarves and all other cozy things?

#whatiwore 2017w27 + Sunday links

Barcelona:

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This week’s suggested reading/watching/listening:

Money talk (at Elizabeth Suzann) – continuing with the value of euros in the age of fast fashion, here you have the most candid ethical fashion pricing description I’ve come across.

Smart garment prototypes by Marina Toeters – “Fashion is surprisingly out of date. The last true innovation widely accepted by the industry is polyester (circa 1953). Dutch academic and designer, Marina Toeters isn’t impressed. According to her, we’re wearing clothes that are technically out of date, and missing a sustainable trick” (Lucy Siegle here).

Wrapped in Nature: Clothing Is An Agricultural Product, by Mary Kingsley – brings you back to the notion that all clothing until that polyester invention and much of it since then has been *cultivated* to start with, so the same concerns that are more and more prominent in food production and consumption should apply. Where was my natural fibers grown? Who planted and harvested them? In what soil? What treatments were used? How did it travel before coming cloth?

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How do you deal with summer outside and AC-ed inside, do you carry an extra piece of clothing for indoors or just endure? How do your fashion priorities change in extreme temperatures? I feel that my style is at its most authentic during the in-between seasons. Cold and heat impose their own priorities!

#whatiwore 2017w26 + Sunday links

Barcelona:

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This week’s suggested reading/watching/listening:

What I Learnt from Karaikal Ammaiyar and Her Closet of Adornments by Sharanya Manivannan – an essay on many things (racism, sexism, slut shaming, transphobia among other) asserting that “Fashion is about far more than vanity, or morality for that matter. It is about identity, memory and emotion. It is a background score to every interaction, conveying ambience, setting the scene, foreshadowing, foregrounding. Every mood-lifting ensemble is a victory. Every garment touched longingly and placed wistfully back on the shelf is a compromise – resignation that sometimes means ‘not yet’ and sometimes means ‘never’.” Oh, yes!

5 Iconic Shoes and Our Ethical Alternatives – brand names are overrated… or you can get new ones to fetishize! Anyways, you can find an ethical alternative for almost any wearable. Yes, it takes time! And, yes, it might cost more! But they exist. So “I wish but…” is not an acceptable stance. Yes, I’m looking at you, Converse, who for years were unable to tell all the poor vegans what glues you are using. Because you just don’t care about your supply chain. Bye-bye, Converse, hello, Veja!

Fiber exploration continues:
Greenwashing Alert: Rayon Viscose Is Made From Plants, but Is Also Toxic and Destructive
Material Guide: How Ethical is Modal?
Rayon, Modal, and Tencel – Environmental Friends or Foes

TL;DR: you have to ask questions and request high environmental and labor standards also with your regenerated fabrics as not all viscose is made equal.

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What are your summer favorites to keep cool (or to keep the cool away if you live in Latvia)? And what inspiring stuff have you been reading/watching/listening this week?

#whatiwore 2017w25 + Sunday links

Riga:

Travel:

Barcelona:

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This week’s suggested reading/watching/listening:

The Hidden Cost of Animal Leather – so you would know what’s wrong with that industry net of animal welfare concerns. Take home message? If you really-really want some leather goods, go for second hand. Or piñatex.

Patagonia’s The Stories We Wear – there are many reasons to love and admire Patagonia, their Worn Wear activities being only one of them (among wonderful workplace policies for US context, use of recycled materials, life guarantee, etc.). They celebrate that people get attached to their garments and have stories about them, especially, of course, about garments that they’ve had for years. Google the full movie “Worn Wear – a Film About the Stories We Wear”, it has disappeared from YouTube but maybe it will come back!

Surprisingly Compostable Textiles – after a serious look at you fibers, you can go on and compost the natural ones! For fun. And to keep the landfill lean.

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Our crowdfunding is half-full, so The True Cost movie screening will happen for sure. While we decide on the date and format of the event… Seems that we will have to draw our stickers by hand, though. If you are more into printed stickers – and hand-written thank you notes, and our neverending love – here is where the euros gather. Thank you so much!

#whatiwore 2017w24 + Sunday links

Riga:

Travel:

Turku:

Riga:

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To add a twist to my weekly outfit posts, I’ve decided to bundle them together with some suggested reading/watching/listening links. Here you go:

Elizabeth Pape on Manufacturing and Selling Women’s Clothing and Elizabeth Suzann – one of the most in-depth and sincere talks about hows and how much of ethical garment production. Also, my leftist-Keynesian self got quite few laughs out of the fact that the classically trained (and clearly a believer in all that HayekFriedman stuff) just cannot warp his head around that an enterprise can be driven by something else but profit. And the fact that an ethical fashion company can actually be profitable just sends him spinning off the cliff!

World Water Day 2017: The True Cost of Conventional Cotton – a reminder that conventional cotton is a big and very dirty issue, i.e. reasons to go organic or second hand.

What Really Happens to Your Clothing Donations? – the basics you need to know before putting your unwanted garments in a donations container.

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And, talking about donations, our crowdfunding is half-full, so The True Cost movie screening will happen for sure. Seems that we will have to draw our stickers by hand, though. If you are more into printed stickers – but hand-written thank you notes – here is where the euros gather. Thank you so much!

Come, fund us! + #whatiwore23

We – me and Liisa – have reached the moment where our ambition of what can be done around topics of fast fashion and greener wardrobes bumps into financial obstacles. The logical next step after three successful swaps (1, 2, 3) seemed to shift the focus towards the reasons for all this. No worries, the swaps will continue! They are the hands-on education that other ways of doing wardrobes and fashion are possible. But let’s have a hot July night with an ice-cold vermouth and even more chilling documentary about the evils of fast fashion… our selected feature for that is The True Cost.

And this is where the money comes in! To make it all legal and hold an official “community screening” we need to pay 130$ to the distributor, and that’s a bit too much than the usual “I’ll make tortilla, you make hummus” cost sharing we have been doing so far.

Also, we have been talking how something small but material would be nice for our friends and un-customers to have after the events and to promote fast fashion résistance around the town (or world, wink-wink!). Business cards are dead, long live stickers! Yet we are finicky customers and instead of buying bunch of tape and drawing them (ha!), we want them nice, round and professionally printed. The smallest order is a roll of 490 stickers and that’s 180€.

So we have made a crowdfunding page to ask our friends if they can chip in. Those living in Barcelona or nearby will be showered with love, vermouth and stickers during the movie night, while those present only in spirit shall receive a love letter in their mail, filled with stickers and thank-you notes. It doesn’t matter if you have benefited from previous Un Armario Verde clothes’ exchanges or just love the idea of a greener wardrobe, every euro helps! So does sharing, following, following some more, reading, commenting and greening your wardrobes. Baby steps towards the slow fashion revolution!

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Oh, I also wore some garments this week. First in Barcelona, then on a plane where the temperature kept shifting from very hot to freezing and then in so-far-very-pleasant-and-dry Riga.

Finding a spot to do the photos in my childhood home (and using the window sill as a makeshift tripod) was a whole additional creative exercise.