#whatiwore 2018w18 + Sunday links

Nom-nom-nom said the little gray cells:

Back to basics and George! I keep going back to his Career Advice a couple a times a year for the last ten years. Helps.

Puzzled by the great cognitive dissonance of our generation bringing together so much awareness and being such avid fast fashion consumers? Me too… Why Aren’t More Millennials Shopping Sustainably? Look at the Price Tag. Although I suppose there is something more apart from hard cash considerations going on.

And a side of social media can of worms: Fake Followers, Fraud, Huge Budgets Still Dominate the Influencer Marketing Sphere, Devumi: The Social Media Company Selling ‘Fake’ Followers to Stars, Politicians and The Follower Factory.

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What’s your relationship with the social media? Do you judge people by the number of their followers? Have you ever thought of aggressive follower acquisition (fake ones, having an algorithm that ‘befriends’ and then ‘defriends’ after you have followed back, etc.)? Have you noticed ‘like’-related anxiety?

#FashionRevolution Fix it! workshop + easy fixes

My Fashion Revolution week fortnight this year consists of two events: an experimental small-scale fix workshop and the swap Nº6. You are still on time to put the swap in your agenda (and you already know the drill) but the fix workshop was something new.

Stemming from my own limited skills in fixing and mending, seeing it as a generational problem mostly (hi, fast fashion, bye, upkeep skills!) and knowing that practice makes perfect, I simply announced a Saturday afternoon when up to ten people could come together at the back of our Ateneu and try to fix their garments. It wasn’t a course and there were 0 powerpoint presentations. The setup included wine, tea, cake, and an opportunity to show your holes and unraveled seams to others, get some input on how to fix in and give it a go.

I was very happy to have my favorite social-sciences-person-turned-textiles-person Julie to host the workshop with me. Her knowledge of materials and dyes and passion for creative fixing (+ she introduced the rest of us to the notion of sashiko and with India Flint!) did so much to ground and structure my enthusiasm. At the end it felt like a little tea party in a parallel dimension enjoying the sorority and fixing the world one stitch at the time.

The concept was to bring only simple (we are just starting here, you know) manually (not to hassle with sewing machines) fixables, and the list was pretty much the expected. Here you have the issues we came across and suggestions what to do about them; these are a mix of the very basics and a bit advanced that we didn’t tackle this time but there were questions about the possibility of doing it:

Unraveled seams: 1, 2, 3.

Holes in jersey: 1, 2.

Holes in socks: 1, 2.

The typical jeans inseam problem: 1, 2, 3.

Putting in bra-strap fixers: 1.

Making a slit: 1, 2.

Hemming jeans: 1, 2.

Changing the shape of a pair of jeans: 1.

And to dabble just a bit into creative fixing, here you have FashRev suggestions to embroider, put patches or pom-poms on your garments to hide stains or rips or just to refresh them.

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The take-away message? Almost all garments are fixable, just google it! The internets are full of kind people showing how to fix anything. Especially if you let go of the idea of returning the garment to its initial state and think about fixing as giving it a loving upgrade instead, the possibilities are endless. And I have a feeling that this won’t be our last fixing event, so stay tuned.

Have you fixed anything recently? Do you aim for perfection, for creative expression or for just getting it done?

#whatiwore 2018w17 + Sunday links

Let’s feed the little gray cells:

So the Fashion Revolution Week came and went, here’s a related reading list: (1) Op-Ed: Five Years After Rana Plaza, Not all Brands Have Changed, (2) Fashion Revolution Week: Fashion by the Numbers, (3) the Fashion Transparency Index and What Really Goes into a Fashion Ranking & How Brands Game the System.

Any moment is a good moment to rethink your personal finances (and savings rates!), here are some ideas: The Spectrum of Personal Finance and On ‘Being Frugal Is for the Rich’.

While I am very skeptical every time a “that garbage turned into this new thing” headline excites the web (remember the orange waste thread hype?), even I have to admit that this is cute: Sustainable Sneaker Is Made From Chewing Gum.

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Did you do something for the Fashion Revolution Week? Have you made any new sustainable fashion commitments? I’m starting to branch into mending and sewing…

Luīze goes to KonMari Consultant Seminar

Seminar photos courtesy of Torble Photo.

If you are reading the fine script under the outfit photos and follow the Facebook page, you’ll know that in January I spent pretty much all my (meagre) savings on booking a place in the first Marie Kondo Consultant Seminar organized in Europe. It was my self-gift for my 30th birthday and I was ready o go to New York or San Francisco, it just happened to be London in April.

I worked very hard to keep my expectations in check: “To either put full stop on my KonMari™ fever or to enter the sect forever, I’m planning to do her consultant training this spring. The price is ridiculous, several of my loved ones have doubted my sanity, and I am aware that the most likely outcome of the course will be slight disappointment and a depleted savings account. But I want to do it. It will be my 30th birthday present to myself. Some people jump with parachutes or swim with sharks, why can’t I spoil myself with a Japanese decluttering seminar?” I wrote in December.

I guess I’ve attended enough international events by now and tried enough new things with a new crowd, so the whole thing went exactly as I expected. In a good way, mind you.

My most pleasant surprise – and confirmation that I’m not insane and/or truly entering a cult – was that every participant I talked to was very pragmatic about KonMari method™. Yes, it has resonated with them. Yes, they had reaped benefits from it. Yes, they see a lot of potential in it. Yes, they want to be part of the brand name and convert it into their business. But everybody was aware that “the life changing magic” is not magic at all but a very effective method of giving people permission to reset their lives via their possessions. No magical fairy dust. Exactly the way I like it.

The other pragmatic point about the whole endeavor is that it gives exactly what it promises – tools to use KonMari™ when working with another people. It’s not a fun friends getaway with a crafts class. It’s not a refresher or deeper dive into our own journeys. Nope, it’s practical, client oriented and down-to-earth. The steepness of the price helps, of course, that’s the threshold for the truly motivated (and those above a certain level of income/wealth, obviously).

And for me the funniest difference between the books, especially the first one, as I already wrote when comparing it with the second one, and the seminar is the amount of wiggle room and the bird’s eye view. Most of the press KonMari method™ has got has been somewhere between mocking and astonished that somebody would insist that folding the socks in a different way would change people’s lives or that, if you forgot a stash of clothing when gathering your clothing pile, you must just throw those garments out. The method is not really about the nitty-gritty of folding (or insert any other little thing that made you close the book midway and go rant about it on Twitter). It comes down to the already mentioned permission to reset, permission to change, permission to embrace our little (or not that little) idiosyncrasies and do whatever spark joy. Yes, Kondo thinks that doing it though possessions and not, let’s say, psychotherapy, meditation or other method, is the easiest way for most people. Turns out it that this way of coaching works for a lot of people…

(The same happens with the initial sexist and heteronormative gender-differentiated approach if the method. It stems from the traditional Japanese (~Western!) household role division where the default is to assume that there is a ‘wife’ who is in charge of the kitchen and household in general, so it’s her duty and interest to make the dwelling a pleasant space and she alone can take all the decisions concerning kitchen appliances, linen, etc.. When probing it, however, the method can be perfectly gender-neutral and applied to whatever households, the only difference being taking a pause and asking about which areas of life and sets of possessions do people share and which ones have one owner-user. Boom! Problem resolved, feminism wins.)

And these are probably the most valuable immediate credentials after the course: I touched Marie Kondo!

Being in London had several advantages: shorter travel, a city I had already been in many times (although London still eludes my grasp!), meeting a couple of friends on the side, and not having to pay for the accommodation. The best one, however, was that Maya not only had a bed to share but also knows me pretty well. So I had an outsider to go through the highlights and my mental notes after each day (and, coming from professional business consulting, provided our recurring insider joke that consulting is a love child of confusing and insulting). Thank you, lovely!

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And now, future…

Yes, I am trying out the whole KonMari™ consultant thing and for that the next step is certification. So I’m looking for clients… I’m still writing the Terms & Conditions but in the nutshell for the first 10 the deal is as follows: I need clients in Barcelona who for free (for the first three) or very discounted price (for the clients nr.4-10, 10€/h) would want to go through their possessions following the KonMari method™ in series of ~5h sessions (the number of sessions depends on the amount of possessions and client’s pace). In exchange for the discounted rate I’d ask for permission to use their cases for certification and ask for extensive feedback to get better at this!

Let me know if you have questions, interest in doing the course (I can answer questions) or a KonMari™ tidying festival (I can help you with that one), or just want to talk about the sociological roots of the sudden minimalist/decluttering craze.

If you interested in learning more about how the consultant training and certification works, I suggest this episode of the Spark Joy podcast and this: An open letter to KonMari Consultant Trainees.

#whatiwore 2018w16 + Sunday links

So I want to London to participate in Marie Kondo consultant seminar…
These are my sartorial experiences, the rest will come later:

A random update 1: The minimalist aspirations are too much at times. I went on a 5 night trip with my everyday backpack and a tote. The tote was mostly food (two big sandwiches, strawberries, an apple, date bars, cherry tomatoes, chocolate and almonds), because hunger always strikes right after the security control. I chose to leave my big camera at home, (correctly) assuming that this trip won’t be spent exploring London for photos (you can see the visuals from my past UK trips here), but did carry a laptop, several notebooks, a Marie Kondo book for her to sign and other life necessities. It worked out well, but was a bit too small… I ended up leaving some stuff (two books and a notebook) with my lovely host for future retrieval.

A random update 2: Given the limited luggage space, I made an exciting wardrobe decision – to take only one (gasp!) proper bottoms: my mom’s hand-me-down bird and flower skirt (+ a pair of leggings but I had no plans to go to the seminar in those) and three tops. So I wore the same bottoms, hence the same silhouette, and repeated two of the tops. And nobody cared! I received three comments about my clothes: two just praising the outfit (they hadn’t noticed that I wore the same skirt the day before) and one remarking on how I was getting the most out of my beautiful skirt. Outfit repetition for the win! Because either it goes unnoticed or you can present it as your personal war against fast fashion.

A random update 3: My effort to look smart and going places had a clear effect – for the first time in my life I was accused (not by a seminar participant but by a friend of a friend of a friend) of dressing conservatively! Not in my face and not as a good thing. It is hilarious, however, and I present all my outfits as an counterargument. I understand how in the age of black skinnies and gray t-shirts uniforms an outfit that looks like I made an effort might be confusing. I didn’t have a bird in my hair or visible radical feminist pins, and apparently the little pale pink sweater was the main culprit:

The perfect blank preppy canvas that it is!

Links for brains!

Talking about outfits as statements, Why Janelle Monáe’s vagina pants make me cheer. And also on feminism and representation, As Vogue Broadens its Gaze, One Might Wonder: What Took So Long?

Why we shouldn’t believe when fashion promises, only when they deliver: Garment Industry Watchdog Calls Foul – Again – on H&M’s Vow to Provide “Fair Living Wage”.

And when spirits falter, A Climate Change Activist on Why Giving Up Isn’t an Option.

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Do people ever misunderstand you through your clothing? Do you ever “deceive” through clothing on purpose? Do you adjust your outfits to the people you are going to meet?

#100wears: Red flea sweater

#100wears is the most beloved garment section where I show off the longevity of items I’ve worn at least 100 times and urge to elevate the rather low #30wears aspiration. Basically, a love song, a poem, a “there are some garments so good I can’t stop wearing them”… My red flea sweater is one of those.

I bought it on a cold Saturday morning in January 2015 in Flea Market Barcelona. That one was a cold winter for Barcelona standards (for the first time in my Northern life I wore two scarves, one on the top of another), I desperately needed a warm layer and here it came, for 5€. And it has got a lot of wear since then, mostly because it’s the *almost* perfect combination of function (warmth) and function (a shape that allows for movement).

The waist is short, hence doesn’t interfere with the natural waist (as opposed to the all-engulfing Lithuanian sweater). This might be my favorite version of a crop top!

The neckline is open and leaves space for collars and necklaces.

The sleeves are the perfect length and hold up if folded.

My only complaint is about the front hem which has a bit too much volume. I don’t care about it when wearing it but often hold it back when taking photos. Like that ☝

The only tag it has says ‘UBER den volken’ and the garment has signs of having been ‘intervened’ and upcycled. My Google search has revealed that it could be a creation of Julia Breiter who, before making new things, did upcycle second-hand. If she ever responds to my email asking for a confirmation, I’ll let you know. Maybe it’s hers, maybe it’s just a coincidence… I’m curious now.

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Have any of your wardrobe staples appeared in front of you just when you needed? What was it? And have you ever done some detective work trying to figure out where a garment came from?

#whatiwore 2018w15 + Sunday links

A random update: Remember my excitement about my new yoga set I found in the swap seed suitcase just before January swap? Shorts-appropriated temperatures have come to at least my yoga studio and the functionality has spoken… those shorts are not for any gymnastics, unless you get a thrill of showing your privates to other people, those are pajama shorts! Although the length is similar when standing up, the construction of the crotch going into legs is different, rendering the new ones equal to a ‘cheeky’ cut when moving or doing splits. Here, one more proof that not all garments are created equal, and one more reason for getting free garments that one can trial out and send back to where they came from. I’m not sure I’ll bring them back to May swap, but that such option exists is already enough for me. And the old worn-out shorts will get at least #30-more-wears.

Old ones (bought second-hand in 2015) vs. the new ones.

And now for something completely different to keep the little grey cells fat and happy:

A sad reminder that ‘made in EU’ or even a more specific (you know my issues with the ‘made in EU’ blanket: 1, 2) ‘made in x country with long artisan traditions’ does not necessarily mean much: What Really Goes into “Made in Italy” Fashion?

Can’t get enough of plastic pollution and want more to be sad and frustrated about? Here you go: nurdles or plastic resin pellet pollution. Or, in Spanish, lágrimas de sirena.

Seeing how other topics – mainly nutrition and food-ethics – were coming into my link section and how time by time even my veganism needs a reminder on why I’m doing this, now there’s a whole masterpost of my vegan / whole-foods plant-based educational materials right on the top menu. You are welcome!

One of the big issues in consumption-based activism is its atomic and (often) online-only character – ethical consumption can be done pretty much in secret and stay between you and your bulk vendors without creating or affecting your community. To get inspiration for IRL activism and events, here you have Monbiot offering reviving communities as a cure for all the neo-liberal ills, and, for more brainy pushes towards people-activities as activism, Robert Ulanowicz on ecosystems and Elinor Ostrom on commons.

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Have you ever had to go back to the old garment after getting a new one and realizing that the old one is better? What did you do then, looked for another new one or went back to the old one?

Yes, there are garments that I’ve never washed

I revised my notes of Kate Fletcher’s Sustainable Fashion and Textiles: Design Journeys (2014, London – New York: Earthscan from Routledge) and found a ‘make post about this’ note in Chapter 3 waiting for me since November last year.
However, as I had it on a limited loan from a far-away library, I only have my notes… and I was convinced that the all data cited about wear frequency were from the Dutch paper cited below. It’s not! I checked all 170 pages of that report… So get Fletcher’s book from your library and check.

Chapter 3 is dedicated to *use* and this phase of garment’s lifecycle is a tricky one as it’s private and individual. It’s hard to track, and the industry just love to put the responsibility on the consumer reminding that (a) ‘ha, you made a shitty decision’ and (b) ‘loads of energy gets wasted and water polluted via poor laundry practices’. And they are not wrong. So (and this is from my notes, Fletcher does not use the f-word):

– A garment spends on average 3 years and 5 months in one wardrobe
– Get 44 wears
– Gets ~3 wears between the washes
– If a person has 10 pairs of underwear, that means 36.5 wears every year (provided that all are worn equally and one per day)
– Most garments get only around 20 washes that cause a lot of environmental impact
– Washing is responsible of 80% of the energy impact of underwear
– Cold washing and line-drying reduces the lifecycle energy for polyester 4 times and for cotton – 2 times
– The increase of individual households with more machines and less people tend to cancel out the washing machine efficiency gains due to smaller load sizes
– The launderette as an alternative are: better because they are communal and guarantee maximal use of fewer machines while getting big loads, worse because they use higher temperatures used and tempts people into using the f*ing dryer

(obviously the averages here are statistical artifacts, provided that there are categories of garments that are washed after every wear and ones that are never washed)

From the Uitdenbogerd et al 1998 paper “Domestic Energy Saving Potentials for Food and Textiles: An Empirical Study” we get that, according to the behaviour of Dutch families in 1997, the most promising options for energy saving in household when it comes to textiles are:

– washing at lower temperatures, including 25ºC cycles,
– use of ½- or S-buttons for ½- and ¾- loads, and E-buttons on the machines,
– longer wearing,
– line drying.

So, following St.Kate’s advice and being mindful that notions of cleanliness has more to do with idea about culture, civilization, piety, propriety (as opposite to dirty) than dirt. And for the germophobes: as a species we are not very good at disease prevention via cleanliness, unless you boil and bleach everything, and even then… ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

(A disclaimer is due here that – quite ironically – our household experienced an order from a doctor to up our temperatures for certain types of laundry lately… So, as always, follow your doctor’s orders.)

Stop the automatic ‘I take it off and put it in the hamper’. Look at it, smell it, ask yourself if maybe drying it on a hanger and/or spraying with a mix of water and essential oils could be enough.

If you have decided that a garment needs washing, collect them until you have a full load (cold washes allow for not separating the colors), get an environmentally friendly detergent and go cold at least with the often worn clothing (very few of us truly cover our garments with mud every day). Rethinking the function of underwear is an idea, too. Let’s keep in mind that one of its missions is to separate the living, breathing, sweating, etc. flesh from our outer garments. The practice of wearing an undershirt might be on its demise (and now associated only with Marlon Brando and old men not wanting to show their nipples), but just give it a thought, especially for places with winters. And remember that the ‘iconic white t-shirt’ is not much more than a rebranded piece of underwear.

The impact assessments tend to include bleaching and ironing, so forget about that shit and the softener too. You never needed those for everyday use anyways. In our household only an occasional stubborn fruit stained serviette gets a 100ºC bleach soak before going in with the rest of household textiles at 60ºC. And only C’s summer shirts and my handkerchiefs get ironed.

Forget the dryer if you can, line drying is a beautiful practice in the sunnier parts of the globe (dry your brights inside out, though, sun is the original bleach; on the other hand, your whites will love it) and the northerners with proper heating at home get an actual health benefit from drying their clothes indoors on a rack – no need for an additional humidifier! The only people I’d give a permission slip for the dryer would be those with a lot of small children and those using launderettes (which normally comes accompanied with no space for a drying rack and a tendency towards mold in their studio apartments). But with reasonably cold/lukewarm water, good detergent and full loads, eh?

And now, after the yearly ‘how to wash’ primer (this was the last year’s), here is the phrase that peaked my interest: “It is very likely […] that we all have durable unwashed items in our wardrobes, but probably have never recognized them as such” (Fletcher 2014: 107). This is part that got me thinking: what are my no-washes? And rarely washes? What would be the common characteristics of the garments that do not get washed?

*No washes* are my fluffy coat (2006),

my festive bolero (2011),

my cape (2013),

my red woolen sweater (2015),

my Lithuanian woolen sweater (2015),

my swimsuit (2015) – rinsed a lot, never washed,

Ginta’s Monton bird skirt (2016),

Liisa’s velvet skater skirt (2017),

my Pavlovo Posad shawl (~2013) and my Cien Colores shawl (2017),

Julie’s cardigan (2017).

The WAG set has gotten no washes, but I’ve worn it only few times, we’ll see this summer if that structured but unlined cotton begs washing. Rare (as in ‘once in a season maybe’) washes are my parka (2003; the outer shell, the inner one has been washed once in 15 years, I think), HnM sweetheart dress (2008), Ginta’s trench (2010), Ginta’s blue silk dress (2016).

So, the riddle is served: what do these have in common? (1) Almost all are outer layers, so that my filthy body does not touch them directly. On the other hand however, the same characteristic makes them more vulnerable to outside dirt: bike oil, bird poo… (2) Many of them are worn strictly seasonally or for special occasions, so the overall number of wears is small, hence reduced exposure to being dirtied. (3) Materials! Wool is my golden amazing darling that does not smell, basically auto-cleans and any minor mayonnaise stain can be fixed with a damp cloth and all refreshing these garments need is just some alone time in wardrobe with a baggie of lavender. (4) Fear and awe inspiring items: I’m scared of fucking them up and wearing them out by repeated washing + the swimsuit which seems to be doing just fine with its chlorine soaks and less-chlorinated rinses afterwards.

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What are your *no washes*? Are those things that don’t need washing because of their function or are those things that you haven’t worn enough? Do you have any secret garment refreshing techniques: spot cleaning, steaming them in shower, freeing them? Tell me, I’m all ears!

#whatiwore 2018w14 + Sunday links

A random update 1: After all my wishing and bragging about going to KonMari London seminar by train, the French rail workers are on strike and I preferred to play it on the safe side. Back to f*ing Ryanair we go… I hope to make my dream trip in June, though!

A random update 2: I have a little politico-fashion kerfuffle going on in my head… (a) I was on antibiotics and now have a sore throat, (b) the weather is right for a light scarf, not for one of my woolen ones, (c) my only light scarf is mustard (HnM 2008, I use it for covering when henna dying and for summer turbans), I love the color and love the scarf, but (d) in the current political climate it is likely to be assumed to be a message I do not feel strongly about (and that’s all I hope to say here about the whole Catalan thing). I know it’s mostly in my head, but at least there the struggle is real. Clearly, co-opting colors for a cause is a very dodgy thing, especially if a cause is not an extremely generalized one. The obvious ‘good’ example here would be the fight against breast cancer, with all the needed caveats about pink-washing – 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.

The scarf ☝

And now for something completely different… feed the brain!

The Fashion Law is asking if fast fashion is going down: Is Fast Fashion Dying in the Age of Wokeness or is it Just H&M? and Bernard Arnault Tops Zara’s Amancio Ortega as World’s Richest European. However, When It Comes to Millennials’ Fashion Buys, Price and Convenience Trump Sustainability. So maybe fast fashion is growing less because we have a shit-ton of stuff already? Or there are just more players in the field and the profits are less concentrated between the two giants?

For a bit of ‘the real conscious business’ and how the ‘don’t buy our stuff’ drives sales: How Patagonia Grows Every Time It Amplifies Its Social Mission.

And, as human ingenuity has no limits, a new way of – maybe? sometimes? – greenwashing: Is ‘Ethical Fashion’ Made with Deadstock Fabric Just Greenwashing?

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Have you had any fashion mishaps linked to meaning attached to garments, cuts, colors? Like, learning that you have the wrong color laces in your boots? Or have you been accused or have had a remorseful moment about past cultural appropriation? I wore bindis for fun in my adolescence, ugh, and nobody around me knew better.

Here, as a bonus: Headdresses white people can wear that aren’t appropriative of non-white cultures. Mind you, while the idea of this ‘master post’ is good, some people would protest against appropriation of animal-inspired and Middle Eastern headdresses, too. Let’s just stick to flower crowns instead!

After 3 months of the big spreadsheet

So the first three months of no-restriction-you-have-access-to-all-just-track-it wardrobe have passed…

Lesson 1: Go with the flow! After years of pruning and tracking I still struggle with the ‘but I *could* wear it more’ fallacy. Yes, I could. But should I? If something does not get worn ‘naturally’ it doesn’t mean that I have to force myself to wear it. More likely (a) it’s not the right weather, (b) it’s for relatively rare occasions, or (c) it’s not right for me in this season of my life, hence, bye-bye has to be considered.

Lesson 2: Taste and wishes change. D-oh! Some garments somehow fit in for years despite changes in my preferences and some don’t. That’s fine. Let it go!

Lesson 3: My wardrobe is still oh-so-ample! In these 90 days I wore 56 different items (and this is not counting underwear, scarves, hats, bags, hosiery). No wonder many didn’t make it to 10 wears.

And now the nitty-gritty of my wardrobe champions and the not-so-much champions of these 90 days by the category:

Layers

Most worn: my mom’s Zara hand-me-down trench (39), obviously. That’s my winter basic, my shining light, my everything. Now it really needs a wash, though.

Runner-ups: the red flea sweater (37) and the Portuguese cape (26).

Never wore: …wore them all.

Dresses

Most worn: my aunt’s hand-me-down PhD dress (11). I was clearly fed up with dresses after the 7 dresses experiment (1, 2). Hope my fondness for them will come back as the temperatures rise…

Runner-ups: my mom’s hand-me-down MnS linen dress (4) and the purple jersey dress (4).

Never wore: kaftan and my mom’s dark blue silk dress. Because, weather.

Tops

Most worn: the demon t-shirt (28).

Runner-ups: my mom’s hand-me-down lace undershirt/blouse (18) and Liisa’s hand-me-down black lace top (16).

Never wore: my mom’s hand-me-down white zipper blouse. Yeah, weather…

Bottoms

Most worn: ZIB black leave leggings (33). Let me explain the legging situation: I do yoga three times a week and swim twice a week, for those activities I leave home mostly in leggings. Then I also sometimes wear them for errands, and instead of tights when it’s cold and I want to be extra cozy. All the wears at home are not counted, but a telling sign is that these 2016 leggings had to be mended once already and now have a new rip again. These 90 days confirmed the central role leggings play in my cold-weather wardrobe, indeed. There were three pairs in my winter wardrobe and not was not too much by any means.

Runner-ups: Amoralle leggings (30) and Liisa’s hand-me-down velvet skater skirt (19).

Never wore: the sari maxi, the lyocell shorts, the rayon shorts. No guessing needed why January and February might not be the months for shorts, even in the Mediterranean.

Footwear

Most worn: Arcopedico wedges (41). They live at work, so the game is rigged in their favor.

Runner-ups: Veja Arcade (29) and Veja Taua Bahia (26).

Never wore: the birks, obviously.

Adornments

Most worn: red wooden necklace (8). None of my adornment got their 10 wears this time. I was trying to relax instead of forcing it, and winters are for cozy layers.

Runner-ups: Jēkab’s necklace (7) and bird and flowers headband (7).

Never wore: the flower ball headband! Ugh, I keep struggling with this one. It’s huge, and we have a love-hate relationship…

Future… and doubts

The show goes on! I’ve already started the next 3 month spreadsheet. There are some replacing to be done (both my Veja Taua are in shreds and I just noticed a tear in the lace undershirt/blouse – things really do wear out!) and some decisions to be made before the May swap.

After these 90 days I have no clear ‘outs’, the only one I’m doubting about is the ~2005 corduroy skirt that looks great but feels a bit off in comparison with my other skirts. I am tempted to toss it (oh, the purgers high!), but my keeper self is arguing against it: (1) they are beautiful, (2) also, they look good on, (3) that would leave me with only 4 winter bottoms, (4) I’ve had them for gazillion years, so, yeah, there’s some sentimental attachment from my ‘past lives’, (5) they are midi length, pink, patterned and sparkly; who on earth will wear that? And similar thoughts on the flower ball headband too – it’s so exuberant that I don’t trust anybody else to wear it either. Ugh!

This is why editing wardrobes of big volume is easier than small ones: the KonMari ‘power of the pile’ works it’s magic and it’s easier to pick out gems from a background of meh. True story.

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What wardrobe lessons have the first three months of this years brought to you? New styles, silhouettes, uniforms, outfit formulas? Letting go of the old ones? Moving towards more stimulating restriction or relaxing the rules?